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Campus Buildings Exhibition

This exhibition consists of information on named buildings on the Kensington campus and the people that the names honour. For more information and photographs of buildings on the university campus, please contact the Archives. Further information on the development of the Kensington campus can also be found in the Campus Development Exhibition.

Buildings

Theatres


Buildings

 
Basser College (D17) 
Originally Constructed: 1957 - 1959.  Officially Opened: 1 July 1959.
 
 
Basser College, April 1963.
(Photographer: Max Dupain, UNSW Archives CN122/174)
 
Portrait of Adolph Basser (1955) by Joseph Smith. (Oil on canvas 104 x 85cms, UNSW Art Collection)
Sir Adolph Basser Kt, CBE, DSc (Hon)
(26 June 1887 - 20 October 1964)
 
Adolph Basser, a businessman and philanthropist, donated significant sums of money to a number of charitable organisations from 1950 - 1964.  This included £40,000 to the university to equip its first residential College, which was then named Basser College in gratitude for this donation.
 


 
Dalton Building (F12)
Originally Constructed: 1955 - 1957. Officially Opened: 28 August 1958.
 
 
Dalton Building at centre, alongside (at rear) the Heffron Building, c. 1960s.
(Photographer: Clive Kane, UNSW Archives CN945/16)
John Dalton FRS
(6 September 1766 - 27 July 1844)
 
The Dalton building, occupied by the School of Chemistry, was named after the great British chemist, John Dalton.
 


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Io Myers Studio (D9)
Originally Constructed:  1981 - 1982.  Officially Opened: 4 November 1982.
 
 
Opening of the Io Myers Studio, 1982 - (l-r) Sir Rupert Myers, the Hon Gordon Samuels, Lady Io Myers, Mrs Jenny Birt. (Photographer: K. Doig, UNSW Archives CN1127/5)
 
Lady Io Myers, 1981. (University Photographer, UNSW Archives CN1133)
Lady Io Edwina Myers
(9 December 1922 - 22 January 2001)
 
Io Myers was one of the founding members and the first President of the U Committee, a group of volunteers that has now raised over $2.8 million for various university projects.  As a Vice-Chancellor's wife, she also tirelessly represented the university at countless ceremonies and functions for over a decade.  In 1999 Lady Myers was awarded one of the university 50th anniversary Jubilee medallions in recognition of her long and dedicated service to the university.
 
 In 1982 the Io Myers Studio was opened, built from funds donated by the U Committee, and named in recognition of Lady Myers's contribution to the university and the U Committee.
 
UNSW Archives holds an oral history interview that was conducted with Lady Myers - see http://www.recordkeeping.unsw.edu.au/Collections/oralhistory/oral_history_ltoz.html#mo for further information.
 


 
John Goodsell Building (F20)
Originally Constructed: 1964 - 1965.  Officially Opened: 7 November 1966.
 
 
John Goodsell Building (right) overlooking the Commerce Courtyard, c. 1970.
(Photographer: George Pashuk, UNSW Archives CN945/35)
Sir John Goodsell, 1977.
(Photographer: John Hearder, UNSW Archives CN1127/10). 
Sir John Goodsell Kt, CMG, Hon. DSc, FASA
(6 July 1906 - 3 July 1981)
 
Sir John Goodsell was Chairman of the NSW Public Service Board from 1960 - 1971.  The John Goodsell building was, however, named in recognition of Sir John's "long and meritorious service to the university".  He was a member of Council from 1953 - 1981, including Chairman of the Finance Committee from 1955 - 1981.  Sir John also served on the boards of both the Prince Henry and Prince of Wales Hospitals from 1961 - 1976 - providing an important link between these teaching hospitals and the university at a crucial time in the establishment of the Faculty of Medicine. 


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John Niland Scientia (G19)
Originally Constructed: 1997 - 1999.  Officially Opened: 3 September 1999.
 
 
Scientia, 1999.
(Photographer: Gollings, UNSW Archives 04/48)
 
Professor John Niland, 1990s.
(University Photographer, UNSW Archives 00A31)
Emeritus Professor John Rodney Niland AC, AO, BCom MCom, PhD, Hon. DSc, FASSA.
(10 September 1940 -        )
 
On 22 February 2006 the Scientia building was re-named the John Niland Scientia in honour of Emeritus Professor Niland's dedication and contributions to the university.  Further information on Emeritus Professor Niland can be found at http://www.recordkeeping.unsw.edu.au/historicalresources/onlineexhibitions/vice-chancellor.html#niland.


 
Lowy Cancer Research Centre (C25)
Originally Constructed: 2007 - 2009.  Officially Opened: 28 May 2010.
 
 
Lowy Cancer Research Centre, 2009.
(Faculty of Medicine, 12/384)
 
Dr Frank P. Lowy, c. 2000s.
(University Photographer, UNSW Archives 08/212/1100)
Dr Frank P. Lowy AC, Hon. DLitt, Hon. DPhil
(22 October 1930 -           )
 
The Lowy Cancer Research Centre was named in recognition of leading businessman and philanthropist Frank Lowy and his family, who donated $10 million towards the cost of its construction.  Frank Lowy was also awarded an honorary Doctor of Letters by UNSW in 1999 and other members of his family are also UNSW alumni.


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Mathews Building (F23) / Mathews Theatres (D23)
Originally Constructed: 1971 - 1973. Officially Opened: 14 October, 1976.
 
 
Mathews Building, 1970s.
(University Photographer, UNSW Archives CN1127/4)
Frank M. Mathews, c. early 1950s.
(Photographer: Unknown, UNSW Archives CN449)
Dr Francis Mackenzie (Frank) Mathews, BE, Hon. DSc, FSTC, FIE Aust
(13 July 1903 - 1 December 1982)
 
In 1976 the Mathews Building and Mathews Theatres were named after Dr Frank Mathews in "sincere appreciation" for his many contributions to the university.  Dr Mathews served as a member of the university's Developmental Council from 1947 - 1949 and then as a member of Council from 1949 - 1981, including as Deputy Chancellor from 1976 - 1981.  Also the Chief Engineer at Australian Iron and Steel, Wollongong from 1950 - 1968, Dr Mathews was responsible for securing the site and raising funds for the eventual establishment of the university's Wollongong University College in 1962, which, in 1975, became the University of Wollongong. 
 
UNSW Archives holds two oral history interviews that were conducted with Dr Mathews - see http://www.recordkeeping.unsw.edu.au/Collections/oralhistory/oral_history_ltoz.html#mfor further information.


 
Morven Brown Building (C20)
Originally Constructed: 1964 - 1966. Officially Opened: 25 June 1966.
 
 
Morven Brown Building, c. 1960s.
(Photographer: Max Dupain, UNSW Archives CN945/46)
Professor Morven Brown, c. 1960s.
(Photographer: Sidney Riley, UNSW Archives CN486/3/18B) 
Professor Morven Sydney Brown, MA, PhD, DipEd
(31 May 1914 - 9 October 1965)
 
Professor Brown commenced his appointment as Professor of Sociology and Head of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences on 1 February 1958.  On 1 January 1960 the Faculty of Arts was established within the university and Professor Brown was appointed as its first Dean.  In a tribute to his work at the university following his death, Council described Professor Brown as "the architect of the Faculty of Arts".


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Newton Building (J12)
Originally Constructed: 1969 - 1970.
 
Newton Building, c. 1970.
(University Photographer, UNSW Archives CN1127/4) 
Sir Isaac Newton PRS MP
(25 December 1642 - 20 March 1727)
 
The Newton Building, occupied by the School of Physics, was named after the great British scientist, Sir Isaac Newton.


 
Philip Baxter College (D18)
Originally Constructed: 1964 - 1966.  Officially Opened: 14 October 1966.
 
 
Philip Baxter College, 1967.
(Photographer: Max Dupain, UNSW Archives CN945/19)
 
Professor J. Philip Baxter, 1963.
(Photographer: Max Dupain, UNSW Archives CN486/3/18)
Sir John Philip Baxter KBE, CMG, BSc PhD, Hon. LLD, Hon. DSc, Hon. DTech, FTS, FAA, FRACI FIEAust, MIChemE
(7 May 1905 - 5 September 1989)
 
The university's third residential College was named in honour of Vice-Chancellor Sir Philip Baxter - further information on Sir Philip can be found at http://www.recordkeeping.unsw.edu.au/historicalresources/onlineexhibitions/vice-chancellor.html#baxter.


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Phillip Goldstein Hall (B17, D16)
Originally Constructed: 1962 - 1964.  Officially Opened: 30 June 1964.
 
 
Phillip Goldstein Hall, 1965.
(Photographer: Max Dupain, UNSW Archives CN122/113)
 
Portrait of Phillip Goldstein (1960) by William Pidgeon.
(Oil on canvas 125 x 100cms, Gift of Mr Phillip Goldstein 1960, UNSW Art Collection)
Phillip Godfrey Goldstein
(6 February 1896 - 9 November 1963)
 
Sydney industrialist, Phillip Goldstein, gave £40,000 to the university in 1959 towards the construction of the central hall for the residential college complex.  Named Phillip Goldstein Hall in honour of this donation, this title covered three separate blocks, including the dining hall and the first college accommodation for women on campus.


 
Robert Heffron Building (E12 - now known as the Australian School of Business Building)
Originally Constructed: 1959 - 1962.  Officially Opened: 16 May 1962.
 
 
Robert Heffron Building, 1962.
(Photographer: Max Dupain, UNSW Archives CN122/100)
Hon. Robert Heffron, c. early 1950s.
(Photographer: Unknown, UNSW Archives CN449) 
Hon. Robert James Heffron, Hon. DLitt, Hon. DSc
(10 September 1890 - 27 July 1978)
 
Robert Heffron, NSW Minister for Education (1944 - 1960) and NSW Premier (1959 - 1964), played a vital role in the establishment and development of the university.  In 1946 he was responsible for persuading the government to approve in principle the creation of a second university in Sydney.  Heffron also served as Chairman of the university's Developmental Council from 1947 - 1949 and then battled to ensure the passing of the legislation to create the university in 1949.  In 1958, when the legislation to change the name of the university from the New South Wales University of Technology to the University of New South Wales was being debated by the government, again Heffron intervened to provide its smooth passage.  On his death in 1978, the university's then Acting Vice-Chancellor Professor Rex Vowels mourned Heffron's passing by describing him as one of the "founding fathers of the university".
 
In 1962, to ensure that "the name of the Honourable R. J. Heffron...shall be permanently commemorated within the university", the then "largest and best equipped" building on campus was named the Robert Heffron Building.
 
More information on Robert Heffron and his contribution to the university can be found in http://www.recordkeeping.unsw.edu.au/documents/Origins12.pdf.


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Robert Menzies Building (E21)
Originally Constructed: 1964 - 1965. Officially Opened: 7 September 1966.
 
 
Robert Menzies Building, 1966.
(Photographer: Max Dupain, UNSW Archives CN945/10)
 
Sir Robert Menzies opening the Robert Menzies Building, 1966.
(Photographer: Norman L. Danvers, UNSW Archives CN486/1/7)
Sir Robert Gordon (Bob) Menzies KT, AK, CH, LLM, QC, FRRS, FRCS (Hon), Hon. LLD, Hon. DCL, Hon. D. Litt., Hon D. Sc.
 (20 December 1894 - 15 May 1978)
 
The Library Building Stage 1 was named the Robert Menzies Building in honour of Sir Robert Menzies, Prime Minister of Australia from 1939 - 1941 and 1949 - 1966, who opened the building in 1966.


 
Robert Webster Building & Theatres (G14, G15)
Originally Constructed: 1958 - 1969.  Officially Opened: 31 October 1969.
 
 
Robert Webster Building, c. 1970s.
(Photographer: Allan West, UNSW Archives CN1127/4)
 
Sir Robert Webster, 1961.
(Photographer: Max Dupain, UNSW Archives CN486/3/18)
Sir Robert Joseph Webster CMG, CBE, MC, Hon. DSc, FASA, FAIM, FIAM
(10 June 1891 - 4 August 1981)
 
In 1969 the building then accommodating the School of Textile Technology was named in honour of Sir Robert Webster and his work in the school's establishment, as well as his other vital contributions to the university.  Further information on Sir Robert can be found at http://www.recordkeeping.unsw.edu.au/historicalresources/onlineexhibitions/chancellor.html#webster.


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Rupert Myers Building (M15)
Originally Constructed: 1998 - 2000.  Dedication Ceremony: 30 June 1999.
 
 
Rupert Myers Building, c. early 2000s.
(University Photographer, UNSW Archives 07/181)
 
Professor Rupert Myers, 1960s.
(University Photographer, UNSW Archives CN486/3/18)
Sir Rupert Horace Myers KBE, AO, FTSE, FAA, MSc PhD, Hon LLD, Hon. DSc, Hon. DLitt, Hon. DEng, CPEng, FIMMA, FRACI, Hon FIEAust
(21 February 1921 -            )
 
The Rupert Myers Building commemorates the contributions that former Vice-Chancellor Sir Rupert Myers has made to the university.  More information on Sir Rupert can be found at http://www.recordkeeping.unsw.edu.au/historicalresources/onlineexhibitions/vice-chancellor.html#myers.


 
Sam Cracknell Pavilion (H8)
Originally Constructed: 1967 - 1968.  Officially Opened: 8 March 1969.
 
 
Sam Cracknell Pavilion, c. 1970s.
(University Photographer, UNSW Archives CN1127/3)
 
Sam Cracknell, c. 1960s.
(Sports Association, UNSW Archives 95A31/1)
Ivan Roy "Sam" Cracknell DipPhysEd
(17 Nov 1916 - 15 July 1966)
 
Ivan "Sam" Cracknell commenced work at the university in September 1954 as the Assistant Amenities Officer and was promoted to Supervisor of Student Amenities in May 1961.  Charged with the development of sport within the university, Cracknell was extraordinarily successful, as from 1953 to his death in office in 1966, the number of sports clubs at the university grew from three to twenty-three. 
 
Cracknell played an important role in the development of sporting facilities on campus, especially the David Phillips Field.  It was therefore considered very appropriate that the sports pavilion adjacent to the Village Green be named the Sam Cracknell Pavilion in his honour.


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Samuels Building (F25)
Originally Constructed: 1989 - 1992.  Officially Opened: 16 December 1992.
 
 
Samuels Building, 1990s.
(University Photographer, UNSW Archives 00A31)
 
Hon. Gordon Samuels and Dr Jacqueline Samuels, 1994.
(University Photographer, UNSW Archives 98A1)
The Hon. Gordon Jacob Samuels AC, CVO, MA, Hon. LLD, Hon. DSc
(12 August 1923 - 10 December 2007)
Dr Jacqueline Samuels, BA, Hon. Fellow, Hon. DUniv
(8 September 1927 -          )
 
The Samuels Building was named in recognition of the contributions of both the Hon Gordon Samuels and Dr Jacqueline Samuels to the university. 
 
Jacqueline Samuels has tirelessly served the university through her work on the U Committee, a group of volunteers that has raised over $2.8 million for various university projects.  She has also, as a long-serving Chancellor's wife, represented the university at countless graduations and functions.  As Jacqueline Kott she has had a long career as an actor and was a member of the board of the National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) from 1976 - 1985.  In 1994 she was awarded a Doctor of the University in honour of her service to the university.
 
UNSW Archives holds an oral history interview that was conducted with Dr Samuels - see http://www.recordkeeping.unsw.edu.au/Collections/oralhistory/oral_history_ltoz.html#s for further information.
 


 
Sir John Clancy Auditorium (C24)
Originally Constructed: 1969 - 1970.  Officially Opened: 23 August 1971.
 
 
Sir John Clancy Auditorium, 1980.
(Photographer: G. Downie, UNSW Archives CN1127/3)
 
John Clancy, c. 1950s.
(Photographer: Unknown, UNSW Archives 02A118)
The Hon. Sir John Sydney James Clancy KBE, CMG, LLB, Hon. DLitt, Hon. LLD
(30 May 1895 - 15 October 1970)
 
The university's second major theatre was named in honour of Chancellor Sir John Clancy.  Further information on Sir John can be found at http://www.recordkeeping.unsw.edu.au/historicalresources/onlineexhibitions/chancellor.html#clancy.


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Tyree Energy Technologies Building (H6)
Originally Constructed: 2009 - 2012.  Officially Opened: 31 August 2012.
 
Tyree Energy Technologies Building, 2012.
(Marketing Services)
Sir William Tyree receiving his honorary degree from Chancellor Gordon Samuels, 1986.
(University Photographer, UNSW Archives 08/212/1277) 
Sir Alfred William Tyree Kt, OBE, DipEE, Hon. DSc, Hon. DEng, FIEAust, FIEE
(4 November 1921 -        )

The Tyree Energy Technologies Building was named in honour of the successful innovator, businessman and philanthropist Sir William Tyree, who donated $1 million to the construction of the building and has pledged a further $10 million in future years.  The Tyree Room, located within the John Niland Scientia, was also named in recognition of Sir William's support for the university.  Sir William was awarded an honorary Doctor of Science by the university in 1986.


 
Vallentine Annexe (H22)
Originally Constructed: 1964 - 1966.
 
 
Vallentine Annexe, 2012.
(UNSW Archives 12/385)
Professor Rupert Vallentine, 1975.
(University Photographer, UNSW Archives CN486/3/18) 
Emeritus Professor Harold Rupert Vallentine, BE MS ASTC FIEAust
(25 November 1917 - 29 September 2010)
 
Emeritus Professor Vallentine joined the university in 1951 as a senior lecturer in the School of Civil Engineering.  He served in a number of different roles during his time at the university, including Head of the Water Research Laboratory (1958 - 1964), Associate Professor (1959 - 1964), Professor (1968 - 1982), Head of the School of Civil Engineering (1969 - 1975), Dean of the Faculty of Engineering (1978 - 1981) and Pro-Vice-Chancellor (1981 - 1982). 
 
Formerly a civil engineering laboratory, in 1996 the annexe adjacent to the Civil Engineering Building was named in honour of Professor Vallentine's many contributions to the university.
 
UNSW Archives holds an oral history interview that was conducted with Emeritus Professor Vallentine - see http://www.recordkeeping.unsw.edu.au/Collections/oralhistory/oral_history_ltoz.html#v for further information.


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Wallace Wurth School of Medicine (C27)
Originally Constructed: 1960 - 1963.  Officially Opened: 11 March 1963.
 
 
Wallace Wurth School of Medicine, 1966.
(University Photographer, UNSW Archives CN100/14)
Wallace Wurth, c. 1950s.
(Photographer: Sidney Riley, UNSW Archives CN449)   
Wallace Charles Wurth CMG, LLB, Hon. LLD, F.S.T.C.
(14 January 1896 - 16 September 1960)
 
The university's first medical building was named in honour of Chancellor Wallace Wurth and his contribution to the establishment of the School of Medicine.  Further information on Wallace Wurth can be found at http://www.recordkeeping.unsw.edu.au/historicalresources/onlineexhibitions/chancellor.html#wurth.


 
Willis Annexe (J18)
Originally Constructed: 1960 - 1963.
 
 
Mechanical Engineering buildings with the building now known as the Willis Annexe at right, 1960s.
(Photographer: Max Dupain, UNSW Archives CN945/11)
 
Professor A. H. Willis, 1970s.
(University Photographer, UNSW Archives CN1127/13)
Emeritus Professor Albert Henry Willis, Hon. DUniv, DSc (Eng), CPEng, FIMechE, FIEAust, WhSc
 (23 December 1917 -       )
 
Emeritus Professor Willis joined the university in 1950 as a senior lecturer in the School of Mechanical Engineering.  In 1951 he became an associate professor, in 1952 he was appointed a professor and in 1954 he was made head of the School of Mechanical Engineering.  Emeritus Professor Willis served as Dean of the Faculty of Engineering from 1956 - 1967 and then as Pro-Vice-Chancellor from 1967 - 1978.  His other roles have included Warden of International House from 1968 - 1971 and Honorary Dean of Emeriti for 1994 - 1995.  Emeritus Professor Willis also wrote a history of the university - The University of New South Wales: The Baxter Years.
 
In recognition of Emeritus Professor Willis's long service to the university, the mechanical engineering laboratory building was named the Willis Annexe in 1996.  In the same year he was awarded a Doctor of the University in honour of his many contributions to the university.
 
UNSW Archives holds a number of oral history interviews that have been conducted with Emeritus Professor Willis - see http://www.recordkeeping.unsw.edu.au/Collections/oralhistory/oral_history_ltoz.html#w for further information.


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Theatres

 
Godfrey Macauley Theatre (E15)
Originally Constructed:  1992 - 1993.  Officially Opened: 11 April 1994.
 
 
Opening of the Godfrey Macauley Theatre - (l-r) Chancellor Gordon Samuels, Mrs Kathleen Macauley, Professor John Niland, 1994.
(University Photographer, UNSW Archives 98A1)
Godfrey Macauley, 1973.
(Photographer: Ken Dolling, UNSW Archives CN486/3/18) 
Emeritus Registrar Godfrey Lionel "Mac" Macauley BEc
(20 October 1913 - 10 October 1991)
 
On 3 November 1950 Godfrey Macauley was appointed the university's Registrar.  Initially this was a part-time position, which Macauley held jointly with his other role as an Assistant Director of Technical Education in the Department of Education.  From 1 November 1952, however, the Registrar position was made full-time - and Macauley was to remain in this position until his retirement on 29 March 1974.  Then Vice-Chancellor Professor Rupert Myers noted that "practically all of the university's laws, rules and regulations have been framed under his guiding hand - and they are greatly respected for their clarity and durability".  In 1974 Council conferred on Macauley the title of Emeritus Registrar - the first award of the Emeritus title by the university to a staff member not of professorial rank.  From 1976 - 1980 he also served as the university's Mace Bearer. 
 
In 1994 Council named the large lecture theatre in the Quadrangle Building the Godfrey Macauley Theatre in honour of the Emeritus Registrar's significant contributions to the university.
UNSW Archives holds an oral history interview that was conducted with Emeritus Registrar Macauley - see http://www.recordkeeping.unsw.edu.au/Collections/oralhistory/oral_history_ltoz.html#m for further information.


 
Keith Burrows Theatre (J14)
Originally Constructed: 1971 - 1972.
 
 
Keith Burrows Theatre, 1970s.
(University Photographer, UNSW Archives CN1127/3)
 
Dr Keith Burrows, 1960s.
(University Photographer, UNSW Archives CN654/21)
Dr Keith Meredith Burrows, BSc, PhD, AInstP, AAIP
(22 February 1927 - 21 December 1969)
 
A lecturer/senior lecturer in the School of Physics from 1959, Dr Burrows was killed in a car accident in 1969.  A colleague, Professor Goldsmid, would later note that "as a teacher of physics [Dr Burrows] combined exceptional ability and sincerity, and improvements in physics education were always very close to his heart".
 
In 1971 Council resolved that the new physics theatre be named the "Keith Burrows Lecture Theatre".


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Rex Vowels Theatre (F17)
Originally Constructed: 1968 - 1970. 
 
Electrical Engineering building and car park - with the building containing the Rex Vowels Theatre at centre, 1992.
(University Photographer, UNSW Archives 98A1)
 
Professor Rex Vowels, 1963.
(Photographer: Max Dupain, UNSW Archives CN486/3/18)
Emeritus Professor Rex Eugene Vowels AO, ME, FSASM, CEng, FIEAust, SMIEEE, MIEE 
(25 January 1917 - 4 December 1981)
 
Professor Vowels joined the university as professor and head of the School of Electrical Engineering in 1954.  In 1956 Professor Vowels administered the installation of UTECOM, the university's first computer, and assisted greatly in the development of computing facilities across the university until his retirement.  He was Chairman of the Professorial Board from 1959 - 1968 and Pro-Vice-Chancellor from 1967 - 1981. 
 
In 1982 the lecture theatre in the Electrical Engineering building was named the Rex Vowels Lecture Theatre in his honour.


 
Ritchie Theatre (G19)
Originally Constructed: 1997 - 1999.  Dedication Ceremony: 28 May 2000.
 
 
Ritchie Theatre Dedication, 2000.
(University Photographer, UNSW Archives 04/25/2/221)
 
Peter Ritchie, 1980s.
(University Photographer, UNSW Archives CN1171)
Peter David Ritchie AO, BCom, FASA
(25 February 1942 -         )
 
The cinema in the Scientia was named the Ritchie Theatre in recognition of Peter Ritchie, businessman and UNSW alumnus, for his fundraising efforts in the Scientia Appeal, as well as his personal contribution of $250,000 to the Appeal.

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